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Planting Instructions for the Magnolia Tree

 For any magnolia, pick planting site carefully. Virtually all types are hard to move once established, and many grow quite large. The best soil for magnolias is fairly rich, well drained, and neutral to slightly acid; if necessary, add generous amounts of organic matter when planting.

 Southern magnolia (M. grandiflora) is good for planting at the beach, though not on dunes. Sweet bay (M. virginiana) tolerates wet soil. The species and selections listed in the chart are adapted to a wide range of growing conditions and are easy for most gardeners to grow.

Magnolias never look their best when crowded, 
and they may be severely damaged by digging around their roots. Larger deciduous sorts are most attractive standing alone against a background that will display their flowers at bloom time and show off their strongly patterned, usually gray limbs and big, fuzzy flower buds in winter.

Small deciduous magnolias show up well in large flower or shrub borders and make choice ornaments in Asian-style gardens. Most magnolias are excellent lawn trees; try to provide a good-size grass-free area around the trunk, and don’t plant under the tree.
About The Magnolia Tree

To many people, the word “magnolia” is synonymous with our native Magnolia grand flower, the classic Southern magnolia with large, glossy leaves and huge, fragrant white blossoms the state flower of Mississippi and Louisiana.

Few trees can match it for year-round beauty. 
How To Care For The Magnolia Tree
Magnolia Tree 
Magnolia trees are diverse in leaf shape and plant form, and they include both evergreen and deciduous sorts.